Werner Heisenberg and Jewish Science: Part III

Werner Heisenberg and Jewish Science: Part III

The Volkswartbund no longer had any supporters in the government since Wuermeling stepped down from his cabinet post as result of the Spiegel affair.  When the 82-year-old Cardinal Frings retired from his position as archbishop of Cologne in February 1969 because of old age, the Volkswartbund lost its most influential clerical supporter.  The Volkswartbund had even become an object of ridicule in the Cologne chancery office and became less and less successful. It was now only a matter of time before the Church abandoned it. 

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Werner Heisenberg and Jewish Science: Part I

Werner Heisenberg and Jewish Science: Part I

Bavaria is a land of lakes and mountains. The Koenigsee is a good example of what I mean. There is a beach here and there, but for the most part the mountainsides plunge directly into the lake. Steep banks mean deep waters, and the Koenigsee is no exception to the rule. The lake is almost as deep as the mountains next to it are high. The water is so clear—the boats near the shoreline seem to be floating on air—that you think you could see all the way to the bottom, but the bottom of the lake is a long way down—623 feet, to be exact—which makes it three times as deep as Lake Erie, one half the depth of Lake Superior, and 300 feet short of Lake Michigan at its deepest. The drama of the Koenigsee comes from its contrast with its surroundings because although it is almost as deep as Lake Michigan, it covers only two square miles, as opposed to the 31,000 square miles which Lake Michigan covers. 

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